Whoever has will be given more, and they will have an abundance…

There is a correlation between Jesus’ Great Commission to “Go make disciples […] teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you” which was given at His ascension (Matthew 28:19-20); and the beginning of the Parable of the Minas in Luke 19:11-13:
 
“Jesus went on to tell them a parable, because he was near Jerusalem and the people thought that the kingdom of God was going to appear at once. He said: ‘A man of noble birth went to a distant country to have himself appointed king and then to return.'”
 
Jesus is obviously referring to His future ascension (and return) in the introduction of this parable. Therefore, the Master’s command given (at his departure) to His servants to multiply what He has entrusted to them; would be the same command that Jesus gave to His disciples (at His ascension) to multiply more disciples who know and keep His words, teachings, commands, and example:
 
Jesus said, “So he called ten of his servants and gave them ten minas. ‘Put this money to work,’ he said, ‘until I come back.'”
I would argue that Jesus’ words, teachings, commands, and example are the minas in this parable. Think about it this way, a disciple in the first century was a follower who would know all of His master’s words, teachings, commands, and example; and would make every effort to keep them.
 
Therefore, every time His disciples “make disciples […] teaching them to obey everything He has commanded them” (Matthew 28:19-20), they are also multiplying His words, teachings, commands, and example.
 
To support this I would point to the correlation between Jesus’ use of the statement, “Whoever has will be given more, and they will have an abundance. Whoever does not have, even what they have will be taken from them,” when He spoke about understanding His teachings in Matthew 13:11-17; and and when He said it again in the conclusion of the Parable of the Minas in Luke 19:15-26:
 
“He was made king, however, and returned home. Then he sent for the servants to whom he had given the money, in order to find out what they had gained with it. The first one came and said, ‘Sir, your mina has earned ten more.’
 
‘Well done, my good servant!’ his master replied. ‘Because you have been trustworthy in a very small matter, take charge of ten cities.’
 
[…] Then another servant came and said, ‘Sir, here is your mina; I have kept it laid away in a piece of cloth. I was afraid of you, because you are a hard man. You take out what you did not put in and reap what you did not sow.’
 
His master replied, ‘I will judge you by your own words, you wicked servant! You knew, did you, that I am a hard man, taking out what I did not put in, and reaping what I did not sow? Why then didn’t you put my money on deposit, so that when I came back, I could have collected it with interest?’
 
Then he said to those standing by, ‘Take his mina away from him and give it to the one who has ten minas.’
 
‘Sir,’ they said, ‘he already has ten!’
 
He replied, ‘I tell you that to everyone who has, more will be given, but as for the one who has nothing, even what they have will be taken away.'”
 
Jesus’ disciples would have known from His previous teaching session that when Jesus used the phrase, “Everyone who has, more will be given, but as for the one who has nothing, even what they have will be taken away,” He was referring to His disciples’ ability to properly understanding and apply His teachings.
 
Therefore, they would have understood the servants in the parable who successfully multiplied their Master’s possessions (His words, teachings, commands, and example), as disciples who successfully made more disciples of their Master.
 
Moreover, the reward of the servants in the kingdom is directly tied to the level at which they multiplied their master’s possessions.
 
This of course begs the question of why was Jesus so insistent of us making disciples who know and keep His words, teachings, commands, and example; and why would He base our future rewards on our success in doing so?
 
As I have previously wrote, the end goal of discipleship is that men bring glory to God by being re-conformed to the image of God that they were originally created to be.
 
This is only accomplished by men being conformed to the image of Jesus; …by them imitating Him as His disciple; …by them knowing and keeping His words, teachings, commands, and example (through the supernatural empowerment and enlightenment of the Holy Spirit).
 
Therefore, God getting the glory He is due is a direct result of us multiplying as many disciples of Jesus as possible, who know and keep His words, teachings, commands, and example.
 
When we keep Jesus’ words, teachings, commands, and example; we are being the image of God we were originally created to be.
 
Thus, to fail to keep the Great Commission is to be the servant who buried His Master’s possessions (His words, teachings, commands, and example) under whatever excuse he could find to bury them under, because he was scared. Was that servant allowed into the kingdom? In the Parable of the Talents in Matthew 25:30, he is thrown into “the outer darkness [where] there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.”
 
Why? Because he refused to do what is needed to be done to bring the maximum amount of glory to God that He is due. Why should God allow such a disobedient servant into His kingdom?
 
If Jesus came back today and asked if we did the one thing He told us to do before He left (just as the Master in the parable who returns from being crowned king did), what would be our answer?
 
Now, someone might ask, “What about all of Jesus’ other commands?”
 
Look again at the Great Commission: “…teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you.”
 
I mean, what else are we supposed to be doing besides keeping the Great Commission?